Plants for Bees of the British Isles

by workerbeej on 9 November 2012

in Resources


Gardeners and beekeepers alike – all friends of the bees – will be glad to note that the International Bee Research Association (IBRA) is publishing a new book, Plants for Bees, a “comprehensive guide to the plants that benefit the bees of the British Isles.”

With both native bee and honeybee populations under threat everywhere,  home gardeners have an increasingly important role to play in helping to support these vital pollinators.  By becoming aware of which plants are most attractive as food sources for bees,  and planting more of those flowers and plants, anyone with a small patch can contribute to offsetting the rapid destruction of habitat and biodiversity on which native bees depend.

Our gardens are … fast-becoming an alternative home for many of our bee species and for our native bees to survive and thrive these spaces are crucial.

In this fascinating book, Dr William Kirk and Dr Frank Howes explain the importance of planting flowers for both long- and short-tongued bee species and sets out clearly which plants benefit which type. A simple key system allows gardeners to quickly identify the advantages of more than 300 plants for each type of bee and the information is punctuated by stunning photography.

Plants for Bees: A Guide to the Plants That Benefit the Bees of the British Isles is available now for pre-order at Amazon.co.uk, or members of the International Bee Research Association may buy the book at a discount by ordering via the IBRA.

For more information:
Visit the website for the book at PlantsForBees.org,
or contact
Sarah Jones, IBRA
16 North Road, Cardiff
CF10 3DY
Telephone: 029 2037 2409
Email: bookshop@ibra.org.uk.

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